Author Archives: Mark Eaton

css.php

Preliminary thoughts on Google Cloud Platform

As I mentioned in an earlier post, I was granted a bunch of Google Cloud Platform credits. I’ve started using them, and here are my initial thoughts: There is a Cloud Platform service for most of the use cases I can imagine for my project. This means that there are a lot of options to […]

Posted in google | Leave a comment

Async

I started working with Python around version 3.3, which predates the addition of asynchronous features into the language’s standard library. Asynchronous programming in Python has come a long way since then; it is now a well-established feature of the language. I first wrestled with async on an Amtrak train, on my way home from the […]

Posted in async, python | Leave a comment

Unexpected funds

I recently found out that I got funding from Google for my journal recommender project. More than I expected, too. I had hoped to receive maybe $200 or $300 of Google Cloud Platform credits, but they gave me $5000 in credits, which was quite a surprise. This is good news for this project, because it […]

Posted in doaj, google, journal recommender | Leave a comment

Further into hardware

I used to really dislike computer hardware. It seemed like it always cropped up as an inconvenience or annoyance when I was trying to do something with code. I preferred the abstractions and ephemeralness of software to the inconvenience of physical things. More recently, my thoughts on this have been changing. In part, I’m realizing […]

Posted in hardware, learning | Leave a comment

Hacker hours

Recently, I have been occasionally guest-hosting Hacker Hours at the Brooklyn Public Library on Sunday afternoons. It’s an event where people get together to work on programming projects, and help each other out by sharing skills and knowledge. It draws some seasoned programmers, as well as people who are entirely new to coding. The informal […]

Posted in learning, meetup | Leave a comment

Feast or famine

Quite recently, I was feeling disappointed that I didn’t have any library coding projects to work on. I felt I was failing at my goal of bringing more code into my academic librarianship. But things change quickly. I’m not sure what happened, but over the course of last week, five(!) new programming projects landed on […]

Posted in Uncategorized | Comments closed

Sentiment analysis

For almost five years now, our library has been archiving tweets about our college. I’ve posted about that here and here. Until recently, I didn’t really have an agenda for this data, other than preserving it. Last week that changed. At our college’s Data Faculty Interest Group, I mentioned the tweet archive as a potentially […]

Posted in archives, python, sentiment analysis, twitter | Comments closed

Recommending journals programmatically

I had been keeping this project under my hat, but I’ve proposed it as a conference talk now, so maybe it’s time to share. I’ve been building a journal recommender tool. It’s aimed at faculty, and is built on data from the Directory of Open Access Journals. The idea is that a faculty member could […]

Posted in doaj, journal recommender | Comments closed

The modern web

I’ve been learning some JavaScript recently. Mostly this is so that I can better understand modern JS frameworks. I have some catching up to do: it has been a while since I looked at JavaScript. Anyhow, my main takeaway from learning (a very small amount) about React and Vue.js is that the DOM isn’t what […]

Posted in javascript | Comments closed

On podcasts

I spend more time than I’d like to on the New York City subway. It’s mostly boring, punctuated by occasional dramatic failures, where getting to your destination seems almost impossible. In any case, I find that my time on the subway needs to be put to use with some productive activity, or I would totally […]

Posted in learning, podcasts | Comments closed
Need help with the Commons? Visit our
help page
Send us a message
Skip to toolbar