Author Archives: Mark Eaton

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Bootstrap and LibGuides

What is Bootstrap, and what can it do for my LibGuides? Bootstrap is the framework that underpins LibGuides, and you’ll find it gives you much more control over how your LibGuides work. Bootstrap provides a collection of CSS and JavaScript components that will help you build responsive web pages. Gaining an understanding of how Bootstrap […]

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LibGuides (part 2)

At the outset, it is possible to overlook features of LibGuides CMS such as groups and their accompanying permissions. But groups can be useful, since they can describe organizational realities, so you may find that they’re helpful to you at some point in your LibGuides journey. For us, LibGuides was a powerful tool to organize […]

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Sushi

A couple of years ago, I started building a Sushi client. Sushi is a protocol for accessing standardized usage reports from our vendors. These reports, called Counter reports, quantitatively describe the usage of our electronic collections. I needed a client because at the time we didn’t have any automated way to gather these reports. It […]

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Reaching in

I am a fan of technologies that you can reach into. I mean this metaphorically, of course. I like computing tools that you can tinker with and make your own. Usually – although not always – these are openly licensed, and usually they deliberately have these affordances. As an occasional teacher of technical workshops, I […]

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Costs of development

Developing a project, even a small one, can be expensive. From when I started working on the Open Journal Matcher in earnest (in January) to when it was more or less complete in its current form (in the beginning of October), I probably spent about $1000 of my grant money. To me, this is a […]

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Into the strangeness

There’s a lot of strangeness writing JavaScript for the web. The edge cases are sometimes mind-bending. This is sometimes not the fault of JavaScript itself, but can be due to the other, non-JS things that the browser is doing. I ran into such problems recently when modifying a widget that provides access to our library’s […]

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LibGuides

These days, I’m really working hard at improving the library’s web presence. In part, this means moving more content over to LibGuides. As a result, we’re using more of the features of LibGuides, specifically lots of custom JavaScript and CSS. It’s nice to be tapping some of these more advanced features, and it has been […]

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Nanogenmo 2020

November is Nanogenmo, or National Novel Generation Month, a cheeky variant on the more well known Nanowrimo, or National Novel Writing Month. The idea is that during the month of November, you write code that produces a 50,000 word novel. Most of the “novels” produced are of course unreadable. But it’s a great opportunity to […]

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Website committee

I was recently appointed chair of our library’s website committee. I am honored to take on this role, as I feel that working to improve our library’s web presence is one of the most useful contributions that I can make to our library. It is also work that I like doing. I can see how […]

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Further into Alma

This week I dug into Alma a bit further, and learned how to do things like make sets and run jobs. I know I’m a bit behind the curve on this – other CUNY librarians have been doing these things for months – but it felt good to level up and figure this stuff out. […]

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